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Making a warp

I spent today in the loomshed.  Things have been hectic over the last few weeks and I have hardly had a chance to go near the loom.  However yesterday with some assistance from a friend I got a few little repairs done on the loom and so I am ready to get weaving again.
First job (long overdue) was to do a general clean and tidy.  Once that was done I sorted out some yarns and started making a new warp.
This particular warp will be used to weave some dark blue tweed for Paul Taggart.  Paul is an artist that I have been working with over the last year or so.  His current project is writing and illustrating a book called The Elphen Chronicles which will be something of a collector's item.  It will be a very lavish book, for which Paul has painted magnificent large oil paintings along with lots of line and wash vingettes and watercolour paintings.  His partner Eileen is filming every stage of this and the book will be available first as a video book.
My involvement is in making various textile items that will serve as props and/or merchandise that will go with the book.  I have made Paul a waistcoat which he wears while reading from the book for the video and I am currently designing a slipcover for the book - silk with lots of embroidery that references Pauls illustrations.  I also wove a short length of tweed for them which I used to make a variety of small gift objects at Christmas time.  This proved so popular that they asked me to weave a much longer piece of tweed.
Here is a video of me preparing the warp.    https://vimeo.com/280007230
I am winding 24 strands of wool yarn around the stakes to give a total length of 60 metres.  This has to be done 29 times to give a total of 696 ends.
the warp bank - 24 cones of yarn










separating the ends to make the X that keeps all the threads in order









finsihed warp - now needs to be chained and beamed









 Luck on my side!  Just enough yarn on these cones to complete the job without having any joins.

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